Mobile Resource Library Tabs

Filters

Search

Asset Publisher

Content with Topic Dementia .

Resources

Please enter a date in the format M M / d d / y y y y

Bass, D.M., Judge, K.S., Snow, L.A., Wilson, N.L., Looman, W.J., McCarthy, C.A., Morgan, R., & Abloorh-Odjidja, C., Kunik, M.E. (2012). Prevalence and predictors of depression, care-related strain, and unmet needs among caregivers of patients with dementia. The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 20, 239-247.

Bass D.M., Easom, L., Primetica, B., & Holloway, C.J. (2015). Reflections on implementing the evidence-based BRI Care Consultation with RCI in Georgia. Generations, Journal of the American Society on Aging, 39(4), 49-56.

Miller, L., Kaye, J., Lyons, K., Lee, C., Whitlatch, C., & Caserta, M. (n.d.). Well-being in dementia: A cross-sectional dyadic study of the impact of multiple dimensions of strain on persons living with dementia and their family care partners. International Psychogeriatrics, 1-10. doi:10.1017/S104161021800203X

Diagnosing Alzheimer’s Disease and What Comes After

As your loved one ages, you may grow concerned about the possibility of them developing Alzheimer’s disease or another form of dementia. However, you may not know how to recognize the signs and symptoms of the disease, how best to discuss your concerns with your loved one, or how to care for them if a diagnosis is made. If you are looking to take some initial steps to assess your loved one’s condition, consider these common questions regarding Alzheimer’s disease to help you better understand the disease and its symptoms and what steps you can take to prepare yourself and your loved one for a diagnosis.

Read More

By Katherine Judge, PhD | 06/12/2019

A SHARE for Dementia family discussing future plans with a counselor

Planning for the Future after a Dementia Diagnosis: Why Working Together Is Important

If we are caring for a loved one who has recently been diagnosed with dementia or a related disorder such as Alzheimer’s Disease, it can feel devastating. Often, families avoid having discussions with their loved one about what the diagnosis could mean for their future out of fear. As the disease progresses over time, we may find ourselves as a caregiver in the position of making important care or health-related decisions for a loved one in a time of crisis, even if we have never previously discussed with our loved one what kind of care they would prefer. As a result, we may feel guilty about having to make decisions on our loved one’s behalf, without prior knowledge of their care values and preferences.

Read More

By Silvia Orsulic-Jeras | 06/12/2019